Corpus ID: 38298386

Proofs-of-delay and randomness beacons in Ethereum

@inproceedings{Bnz2017ProofsofdelayAR,
  title={Proofs-of-delay and randomness beacons in Ethereum},
  author={Benedikt B{\"u}nz and Steven Goldfeder and Joseph Bonneau},
  year={2017}
}
Blockchains generated using a proofof-work consensus protocol, such as Bitcoin or Ethereum, are promising sources of public randomness. However, the randomness is subject to manipulation by the miners generating the blockchain. A general defense is to apply a delay function, preventing malicious miners from computing the random output until it is too late to manipulate it. Ideally, this delay function can provide a short proofof-delay that is efficient enough to be verified within a smart… Expand

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