Proof and evolutionary analysis of ancient genome duplication in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

@article{Kellis2004ProofAE,
  title={Proof and evolutionary analysis of ancient genome duplication in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae},
  author={Manolis Kellis and Bruce W. Birren and Eric S. Lander},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={428},
  pages={617-624}
}
Whole-genome duplication followed by massive gene loss and specialization has long been postulated as a powerful mechanism of evolutionary innovation. [...] Key Result The two genomes are related by a 1:2 mapping, with each region of K. waltii corresponding to two regions of S. cerevisiae, as expected for whole-genome duplication. This resolves the long-standing controversy on the ancestry of the yeast genome, and makes it possible to study the fate of duplicated genes directly. Strikingly, 95% of cases of…Expand
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