Promotion of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss by Chemical Contaminants

@article{Fechter2004PromotionON,
  title={Promotion of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss by Chemical Contaminants},
  author={Laurence D. Fechter},
  journal={Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A},
  year={2004},
  volume={67},
  pages={727 - 740}
}
  • L. Fechter
  • Published 1 April 2004
  • Medicine, Chemistry
  • Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A
Recent studies have underscored the ability of a wide range of chemical agents to potentate noise-induced hearing loss. Given the ubiquitous nature of noise exposure particularly in many work settings, the high rate of noise-induced hearing loss, the limited degree to which auditory function can recover following damage to the inner ear, and the disparate chemical structures that appear capable of impairing hearing, this issue appears to have great public health signifi-cance. A compendium of… 
Noise and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL)
TLDR
Recently prolonged exposure to noise at the environmental noise level has been found to induce hidden hearing loss (cochlear injuries without a detectable hearing loss) and is receiving more attention.
Hearing loss in rats from combined exposure to carbon monoxide, toluene and impulsive noise
), the greatest risk for hearing loss from combined exposures seems to be from simultaneous exposure to ototoxic chemicals and impulsive noise. Toluene exposure may cause hearing loss in rats at high
Subchronic Jp-8 Jet Fuel Exposure Enhances Vulnerability To Noise-Induced Hearing Loss In Rats
TLDR
This study provides a basis for estimating excessive hearing loss under conditions of subchronic JP-8 jet fuel exposure and identifies significant impairment of auditory thresholds especially for high-frequency tones was identified in the male rats receiving combined treatment.
A weight of evidence approach for the assessment of the ototoxic potential of industrial chemicals
TLDR
Human and animal studies indicate that lead, styrene, toluene and trichloroethylene are ototoxic and ethyl benzene, n-hexane and p-xylene are possibly ototoxicity at concentrations that are relevant to the occupational setting.
Ototoxicity of trichloroethylene in concentrations relevant for the working environment
TLDR
There is no convincing evidence of trichloroethylene-induced hearing losses in workers, and the literature on the effects of low-level exposure to trich chloro methylene on the auditory system is reviewed, recommending considering it as an ototoxic agent.
Auditory effects of chronic exposure to carbon monoxide and noise among workers
TLDR
To determine if workers chronically exposed to CO and noise, in the workplace or during non-occupational activities face a greater risk of acquiring NIHL, a database of 49,495 workers developed and maintained between 1983 and 1996 was used.
Combined Exposures to Noise and Chemicals at Work
Simultaneous exposure to physical and chemical hazards is common in the general environment. Chemical agents are present in air, water, food, and soil, and they contribute to many chronic diseases.
Ototoxicity of Toluene and Styrene: State of Current Knowledge
TLDR
The main objective of this review was to analyze the available scientific literature on the ototoxic effects of styrene and toluene, in order to examine dose-response/effect relationships and the relevance of the prevention strategy for people exposed to these solvents.
Chapter 37 Noise
Publisher Summary When considering noise in relation to sound, what is commonly meant is meaningless background sound of greater than usual volume. However, in the study of effect of noise on
Noise-induced hearing loss in workers exposed to urban stressors.
The technological and industrial progress together with the intensification of vehicular traffic and the adoption of new social habits are the cause of an increasing noise pollution with possible
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 75 REFERENCES
Potentiation of noise-induced hearing loss by low concentrations of hydrogen cyanide in rats.
TLDR
Low-level chemical asphyxiant exposure as a risk factor capable of potentiating noise-induced hearing loss is identified and exposure levels provide a range of concentrations below to slightly above the short-term exposure limit for HCN.
Predicting exposure conditions that facilitate the potentiation of noise-induced hearing loss by carbon monoxide.
TLDR
The relationship between noise severity and potentiation of NIHL by CO shows a nonlinear relationship and the potential risk of hearing loss from combined exposure to noise and CO, and the risks associated with repeated exposure are underscore.
Effect of hypoxia on noise-induced auditory impairment
TLDR
The combined exposure to noise and hypoxic air caused more hearing loss and hair cell loss than the noise alone, suggesting that people suffering from hypoxia may have increased risk to noise trauma.
Adverse effects of noise on hearing.
TLDR
The most effective way to decrease the incidence of noise-induced hearing loss is to educate people about the adverse health effects of excessive noise and to teach them how to protect their hearing.
Carbon monoxide exposure potentiates high-frequency auditory threshold shifts induced by noise
TLDR
The potentiation of noise- induced threshold shifts by carbon monoxide provides additional support for the hypothesized role of metabolic exhaustion or bloodflow impairment in noise-induced hearing loss and suggests a possible interpretation of clinical findings of auditory impairment associated withcarbon monoxide exposure.
Acrylonitrile produces transient cochlear function loss and potentiates permanent noise-induced hearing loss.
TLDR
The results confirm the prediction that ACN is acutely ototoxic and can enhance noise-induced hearing loss.
Combined effects of noise and styrene exposure on hearing function in the rat
TLDR
The results suggest that the two ototoxicants, noise and styrene, can cause a permanent synergistic loss of auditory sensitivity.
Intermittent noise-induced hearing loss and the influence of carbon monoxide
TLDR
Intermittent noise causes less hearing loss than continuous noise of equal intensity and induced a less permanent threshold shift (PTS) than those that had a longer noise duty cycle (or less rest periods).
The Role of Antioxidants in Protection from Impulse Noise
TLDR
This review describes three experiments that point to ROS as a causative factor in both noise‐ and drug‐induced hearing loss and antioxidants as a protective agent in chinchillas.
Potentiation of noise induced threshold shifts and hair cell loss by carbon monoxide
TLDR
The chronic effects of simultaneous exposures to noise and carbon monoxide on pure tone thresholds and hair cell survival in rats are reported on to reinforce the view that some types of noise induced damage may result from metabolic insufficiencies.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...