Promoting the One-Child Policy in China

@article{Green1988PromotingTO,
  title={Promoting the One-Child Policy in China},
  author={L. W. Green},
  journal={Journal of Public Health Policy},
  year={1988},
  volume={9},
  pages={273-283}
}
  • L. Green
  • Published 1 June 1988
  • Political Science
  • Journal of Public Health Policy
After years of urging China to take more aggressive action to control its population, the United States government withdrew support from the United Nations Fund for Population Activities on the grounds that that agency supported China's new policy. The policy provided for the achievement of a norm of one child per couple through economic incentives and rewards, and family planning services including abortion. Charges of forced abortion in the Western press led to withdrawal of the U.S. funds by… 
Health in China: The one child family policy: the good, the bad, and the ugly
TLDR
The one child family policy in China was introduced in 1979 and has remained in force ever since, beneficial in terms of curbing population growth, aiding economic growth, and improving the health and welfare of women and children.
Neo-Malthusianism and Coercive Population Control in China and India
In the 1960s and 1970s, neo‐​Malthusian panic about overpopulation overtook eugenics as the primary motivation behind coercive policies aimed at limiting childbearing. Neo‐​Malthusian ideas spread
The One Child Family Policy
  • W. X. Zhu
  • Political Science
    Archives of disease in childhood
  • 2003
The government hopes that there will be a shift towards the “small family culture” What is known as the One Child Policy was introduced in 1979 as a set of rules and regulations governing the
The Puzzle of China's Leftover Women
The aim of this thesis is to identify the roots of the leftover women phenomenon in order to understand why it has appeared. In particular, we examine why the leftover women are having difficulties
Behavior change strategies for family planning.
Perinatal Care: Cultural and Technical Differences between China and the United States
  • H. Liu, J. Moore
  • Medicine
    Journal of transcultural nursing : official journal of the Transcultural Nursing Society
  • 2000
TLDR
A comparison of perinatal care in the U.S. and China is presented and North American women have greater access to early prenatal and continuing care, and less infant mortality, while Chinese women have less access to qualified nursing services, higher infant mortality rates, and limited perinnatal education.
Intergenerational Mobility in China Kelly Labar
In this paper, I study the intergenerational mobility of education and income in China. Using the CHNS database which gives information on parental educational attainment and income level, I show
Intergenerational Mobility in China
In this paper, I study the intergenerational mobility of education and income in China. Using the CHNS database which gives information on parental educational attainment and income level, I show
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-4 OF 4 REFERENCES
Chinas one-child family: policy and public response.
Despite evidence of opposition to official population policies the government decided to adopt the 1 child family as its goal in 1979. This paper explores the economic social and demographic
Patterns of contraceptive use in China.
  • D. Poston
  • Economics
    Studies in family planning
  • 1986
This article uses demographic and contraceptive use data from China's 1982 census, 1982 national fertility survey, and National Family Planning Commission to examine the country's patterns of
An anthropometric study of school children.
TLDR
The increases between 1975 and 1981 in body weight for boys and girls were greatest for those in their adolescent growth spurt periods and the mean height values for Shanghai County in 1981 were lower than the 50th percentile figures from data the Fels Research Institute collected in the U.S. during the 1929-1975 period.