Promoting Academic Literacy with Urban Youth through Engaging Hip-Hop Culture.

@article{Morrell2002PromotingAL,
  title={Promoting Academic Literacy with Urban Youth through Engaging Hip-Hop Culture.},
  author={Ernest Morrell and Jeffrey Michael Reyes Duncan-Andrade},
  journal={English Journal},
  year={2002},
  volume={91},
  pages={88-92}
}
he Digest of Education Statistics forecasts that, during the next decade, the number of ethnic minority teachers will shrink to 5 percent, while the enrollment of ethnic minority children in America’s schools will grow to 41 percent. As classrooms across the country become increasingly diverse, determining how to connect in significant ways across multiple lines of difference may be the greatest challenge facing teachers today. Teachers in new century schools must meet this challenge and find… 

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