• Corpus ID: 23278081

Prolonged whole body immersion in cold water: hormonal and metabolic changes.

@article{Smith1990ProlongedWB,
  title={Prolonged whole body immersion in cold water: hormonal and metabolic changes.},
  author={D. J. Smith and Patricia A. Deuster and C J Ryan and Thomas J. Doubt},
  journal={Undersea biomedical research},
  year={1990},
  volume={17 2},
  pages={
          139-47
        }
}
To characterize metabolic and hormonal responses during prolonged whole body immersion, 16 divers wearing dry suits completed four immersions in 5 degrees C water during each of two 5-day air saturation dives at 6.1 meters of sea water. One immersion began in the AM (1000 h) and one began in the PM (2200 h) to evaluate diurnal variations. Venous blood samples were obtained before and after completion of each immersion. Cortisol and ACTH levels demonstrated diurnal variation, with larger… 

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