Projected benefits of active surveillance for vancomycin-resistant enterococci in intensive care units.

@article{Perencevich2004ProjectedBO,
  title={Projected benefits of active surveillance for vancomycin-resistant enterococci in intensive care units.},
  author={E. Perencevich and D. Fisman and M. Lipsitch and A. Harris and J. Morris and D. Smith},
  journal={Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America},
  year={2004},
  volume={38 8},
  pages={
          1108-15
        }
}
  • E. Perencevich, D. Fisman, +3 authors D. Smith
  • Published 2004
  • Medicine
  • Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Hospitals use many strategies to control nosocomial transmission of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Strategies include "passive surveillance," with isolation of patients with known previous or current VRE colonization or infection, and "active surveillance," which uses admission cultures, with subsequent isolation of patients who are found to be colonized with VRE. We created a mathematical model of VRE transmission in an intensive care unit (ICU) using data from an existing active… Expand
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