Progressive supranuclear palsy

@article{Golbe2006ProgressiveSP,
  title={Progressive supranuclear palsy},
  author={Lawrence I. Golbe},
  journal={Current Treatment Options in Neurology},
  year={2006},
  volume={3},
  pages={473-477}
}
  • L. Golbe
  • Published 1 November 2001
  • Medicine
  • Current Treatment Options in Neurology
Opinion statement•Unfortunately, no drug treatment has been shown to benefit patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) more than modestly or briefly. The multiplicity of neuronal systems and synaptic physiologies that degenerate in this disorder makes a neurotransmitter-specific approach, such as neurotransmitter replacement or reuptake inhibition, unlikely to succeed. Nevertheless, some of these are worth trying in nearly every patient with PSP. Useful drug treatment may ultimately… Expand
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To the Editor: Progressive supranuclear palsy is an atypical Parkinsonian syndrome characterized by motor symptoms (voluntary-eye-movement abnormalities, akinesia, rigidity, postural instability,Expand
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Genetic advances have confirmed the H1 tau haplotype on chromosome 17q21.31 to be associated with PSP, while the H2 haplotype seems protective. Expand
Pramipexole in progressive supranuclear palsy
TLDR
The authors report the results of pramipexole treatment (4.5 mg daily) in six patients with PSP, and found that pramipexoles was not efficacious for the symptoms of PSP. Expand
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Dopamine agonists such as bromocriptine and pergolide may be useful in some patients with PSP and anticholinergic drugs failed to benefit any of the 5 patients treated, while presynaptic dopaminergic drugs were beneficial in only 5 of 22 patient trials. Expand
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Cholinergic replacement therapy alone is not likely to improve symptoms in a disorder characterized by a more widespread impairment of monoaminergic systems, and the lack of effect of donepezil in this disorder is confirmed. Expand
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TLDR
PSP has become familiar as a chronic progressive disorder with extrapyramidal rigidity, bradykinesia, gait impairment, bulbar palsy, dementia and a characteristic supranuclear ophthalmoplegia and its etiology remains obscure. Expand
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The etiology of this neurodegenerative disorder is unknown and the neurodiagnostic studies usually are not helpful in proving the diagnosis, but the anti-parkinson drugs, particularly dopamine agonists, may be useful in the early stages of the disease. Expand
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A retrospective chart review of pathologically confirmed cases of progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy confirms that RS had a less favourable course than PSP-P, and that early autonomic failure in MSA is associated with shorter survival. Expand
Progressive supranuclear palsy: clinical presentation and rehabilitation of two patients.
TLDR
The rehabilitation program consisted of a thorough physical evaluation; cognitive and speech evaluation and training; exercises to improve strength and coordination; and static and dynamic balance training, and provided the patients with a heavy shopping cart or wheelchair that they could grab when in danger of losing their balance. Expand
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