Progressive supranuclear palsy

@article{Gearing1994ProgressiveSP,
  title={Progressive supranuclear palsy},
  author={Marla Gearing and Don A. Olson and Ray L. Watts and Suzanne S. Mirra},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={1994},
  volume={44},
  pages={1015 - 1015}
}
To investigate potential heterogeneity in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), we examined 13 patients with neuropathologically diagnosed PSP. The clinical diagnosis of PSP was made in eight of these individuals, whereas probable AD was the primary diagnosis in the remaining five. In addition to PSP neuropathology, seven of the 13 patients (54%) showed concomitant pathologic changes of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), or both disorders. These observations indicate that AD… Expand
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Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: A Review of Co-existing Neurodegeneration
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  • Medicine
  • Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences / Journal Canadien des Sciences Neurologiques
  • 2008
TLDR
This study has demonstrated the frequent co-existence of pathological changes usually noted in other neurodegenerative diseases in PSP, and whether these coexisting pathological changes contribute to the cognitive impairment in PSP remains uncertain. Expand
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TLDR
An evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of clinical and neuropathological criteria of PSP in a larger series of histopathologically confirmed cases seems mandatory. Expand
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  • L. Golbe
  • Medicine
  • Seminars in neurology
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TLDR
Treatment remains supportive, although coenzyme Q-10 has shown preliminary symptomatic efficacy and levodopa may provide transient, modest benefit and magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measures are showing promise as early-stage screening tools. Expand
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  • I. Litvan
  • Medicine
  • Bailliere's clinical neurology
  • 1997
TLDR
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TLDR
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