Progressive supranuclear palsy: clinicopathological concepts and diagnostic challenges

@article{Williams2009ProgressiveSP,
  title={Progressive supranuclear palsy: clinicopathological concepts and diagnostic challenges},
  author={David R. Williams and Andrew John Lees},
  journal={The Lancet Neurology},
  year={2009},
  volume={8},
  pages={270-279}
}
Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a clinical syndrome comprising supranuclear palsy, postural instability, and mild dementia. Neuropathologically, PSP is defined by the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles. Since the first description of PSP in 1963, several distinct clinical syndromes have been described that are associated with PSP; this discovery challenges the traditional clinicopathological definition and complicates diagnosis in the absence of a reliable, disease-specific… Expand
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