Progressive resistance strength training can reduce physical disability in older adults

@article{Keuerleber2012ProgressiveRS,
  title={Progressive resistance strength training can reduce physical disability in older adults},
  author={Julia Keuerleber and Nicholas Henschke},
  journal={British Journal of Sports Medicine},
  year={2012},
  volume={46},
  pages={323 - 324}
}
▶ Liu CJ, Latham N. Can progressive resistance strength training reduce physical disability in older adults? A meta-analysis study. Disabil Rehabil 2011;33:87–97.[OpenUrl][1][CrossRef][2][PubMed][3] With increasing age, muscle mass and muscle strength of the extremities diminish due to neuromuscular changes.1 These age-related changes are associated with increased physical disability and risk of falling.2 Progressive resistance strength training (PRT) increases muscle strength in older adults… 

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Can progressive resistance strength training reduce physical disability in older adults? A meta-analysis study

Although the effect size is small, the intervention groups showed reduced physical disability when compared to the control groups and it is suggested therapists use responsive outcome measures and multi-component intervention approach to maximise the effect.

Progressive resistance strength training for improving physical function in older adults.

Evidence is provided that PRT is an effective intervention for improving physical functioning in older people, including improving strength and the performance of some simple and complex activities, and some caution is needed with transferring these exercises for use with clinical populations.

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The evidence of muscle weakness as a risk factor for falls in older adults is evaluated and the likelihood of falls is summarized.