Progressive apraxia of speech presenting as isolated disorder of speech articulation and prosody: A case report

@article{Ricci2008ProgressiveAO,
  title={Progressive apraxia of speech presenting as isolated disorder of speech articulation and prosody: A case report},
  author={Michelangelo . Ricci and Maria Magarelli and Valerio Todino and A Bianchini and Eugenio Calandriello and Rosanna Tramutoli},
  journal={Neurocase},
  year={2008},
  volume={14},
  pages={162 - 168}
}
Apraxia of speech (AOS) is a rare disorder of motor speech programming, and few case reports have included sufficient description of both clinical findings and lesion localization. We report a case with an isolated progressive speech articulation deficit and brain involvement restricted to the left superior frontal gyrus. This case suggests that slowly progressive AOS may be a clinical disorder distinct from primary progressive aphasia, and that it can occur without language disorders or bucco… Expand
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