Progression to AIDS, a clinical AIDS condition and mortality: psychosocial and physiological predictors

@article{Leserman2002ProgressionTA,
  title={Progression to AIDS, a clinical AIDS condition and mortality: psychosocial and physiological predictors},
  author={Jane Leserman and John M. Petitto and Hong Gu and Bradley N. Gaynes and J Barroso and Robert N. Golden and Diana O. Perkins and James D. Folds and D. L. Evans},
  journal={Psychological Medicine},
  year={2002},
  volume={32},
  pages={1059 - 1073}
}
Background. The primary aim of this study is to examine prospectively the association of stressful life events, social support, depressive symptoms, anger, serum cortisol and lymphocyte subsets with changes in multiple measures of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression. Methods. Ninety-six HIV-infected gay men without symptoms or anti-retroviral medication use at baseline were studied every 6 months for up to 9 years. Disease progression was defined in three ways using the… 
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Predictors of AIDS-related morbidity and mortality in a southern U.S. Cohort.
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