Progress in understanding mood disorders: optogenetic dissection of neural circuits

@article{Lammel2014ProgressIU,
  title={Progress in understanding mood disorders: optogenetic dissection of neural circuits},
  author={Stephan Lammel and Kay M. Tye and Melissa R. Warden},
  journal={Genes},
  year={2014},
  volume={13}
}
Major depression is characterized by a cluster of symptoms that includes hopelessness, low mood, feelings of worthlessness and inability to experience pleasure. The lifetime prevalence of major depression approaches 20%, yet current treatments are often inadequate both because of associated side effects and because they are ineffective for many people. In basic research, animal models are often used to study depression. Typically, experimental animals are exposed to acute or chronic stress to… 
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