Progress in bioleaching: fundamentals and mechanisms of bacterial metal sulfide oxidation—part A

@article{Vera2013ProgressIB,
  title={Progress in bioleaching: fundamentals and mechanisms of bacterial metal sulfide oxidation—part A},
  author={Mario Vera and Axel Schippers and Wolfgang Sand},
  journal={Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology},
  year={2013},
  volume={97},
  pages={7529-7541}
}
Bioleaching of metal sulfides is performed by a diverse group of microorganisms. The dissolution chemistry of metal sulfides follows two pathways, which are determined by the mineralogy and the acid solubility of the metal sulfides: the thiosulfate and the polysulfide pathways. Bacterial cells can effect this metal sulfide dissolution via iron(II) ion and sulfur compound oxidation. Thereby, iron(III) ions and protons, the metal sulfide-attacking agents, are available. Cells can be active either… 
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Bioleaching of metal sulfides is caused by astonishingly diverse groups of bacteria. Today, at least 11 putative prokaryotic divisions can be related to this phenomenon. In contrast, the dissolution
Bioleaching review part A:
Bioleaching of metal sulfides is caused by astonishingly diverse groups of bacteria. Today, at least 11 putative prokaryotic divisions can be related to this phenomenon. In contrast, the dissolution
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