Progestogens used in postmenopausal hormone therapy: differences in their pharmacological properties, intracellular actions, and clinical effects.

@article{Stanczyk2013ProgestogensUI,
  title={Progestogens used in postmenopausal hormone therapy: differences in their pharmacological properties, intracellular actions, and clinical effects.},
  author={Frank Z. Stanczyk and Janet P Hapgood and Sharon A Winer and Daniel R. Mishell},
  journal={Endocrine reviews},
  year={2013},
  volume={34 2},
  pages={
          171-208
        }
}
The safety of progestogens as a class has come under increased scrutiny after the publication of data from the Women's Health Initiative trial, particularly with respect to breast cancer and cardiovascular disease risk, despite the fact that only one progestogen, medroxyprogesterone acetate, was used in this study. Inconsistency in nomenclature has also caused confusion between synthetic progestogens, defined here by the term progestin, and natural progesterone. Although all progestogens by… Expand
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