Progestogens and venous thromboembolism in menopausal women: an updated oral versus transdermal estrogen meta-analysis

@article{Scarabin2018ProgestogensAV,
  title={Progestogens and venous thromboembolism in menopausal women: an updated oral versus transdermal estrogen meta-analysis},
  author={P. Scarabin},
  journal={Climacteric},
  year={2018},
  volume={21},
  pages={341 - 345}
}
Abstract Postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) is a modifiable risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE). While the route of estrogen administration is now well recognized as an important determinant of VTE risk, there is also increasing evidence that progestogens may modulate the estrogen-related VTE risk. This review updates previous meta-analyses of VTE risk in HT users, focusing on the route of estrogen administration, hormonal regimen and progestogen type. Among women using estrogen-only… Expand
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