Professors and their politics: The policy views of social scientists

@article{Klein2005ProfessorsAT,
  title={Professors and their politics: The policy views of social scientists},
  author={D. Klein and Charlotta Stern},
  journal={Critical Review},
  year={2005},
  volume={17},
  pages={257 - 303}
}
Abstract Academic social scientists overwhelmingly vote Democratic, and the Democratic hegemony has increased significantly since 1970. Moreover, the policy preferences of a large sample of the members of the scholarly associations in anthropology, economics, history, legal and political philosophy, political science, and sociology generally bear out conjectures about the correspondence of partisan identification with left/right ideal types; although across the board, both Democratic and… Expand
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