Professional Autonomy and the Normative Structure of Medical Practice

@article{Hoogland2000ProfessionalAA,
  title={Professional Autonomy and the Normative Structure of Medical Practice},
  author={Jan Hoogland and Henk Jochemsen},
  journal={Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics},
  year={2000},
  volume={21},
  pages={457-475}
}
Professional autonomy is often described as a claim of professionalsthat has to serve primarily their own interests. However, it can also beseen as an element of a professional ideal that can function as astandard for professional, i.e. medical practice. This normativeunderstanding of the medical profession and professional autonomy facesthree threats today. 1) Internal erosion of professional autonomy due toa lack of internal quality control by the medical profession; 2)the increasing upward… 
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