Productivity and diversity of morel mushrooms in healthy, burned, and insect-damaged forests of northeastern Oregon

@article{Pilz2004ProductivityAD,
  title={Productivity and diversity of morel mushrooms in healthy, burned, and insect-damaged forests of northeastern Oregon},
  author={D. Pilz and N. Weber and M. C. Carter and C. Parks and R. Molina},
  journal={Forest Ecology and Management},
  year={2004},
  volume={198},
  pages={367-386}
}
  • D. Pilz, N. Weber, +2 authors R. Molina
  • Published 2004
  • Biology
  • Forest Ecology and Management
  • Abstract Large commercial crops of morels are harvested annually from montane coniferous forests of the northwestern United States. Although some morels fruit annually in nondisturbed forests, others fruit copiously in areas experiencing fire, insect infestations, tree mortality, and soil disturbance. Many forest managers currently use thinning and prescribed fire to re-create forest conditions that existed before the advent of wide-scale fire suppression, thus opportunities exist to promote… CONTINUE READING

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