Producing Song: The Vocal Apparatus

@article{Suthers2004ProducingST,
  title={Producing Song: The Vocal Apparatus},
  author={Roderick A. Suthers and Sue Anne Zollinger},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={1016}
}
Abstract: In order to achieve the goal of understanding the neurobiology of birdsong, it is necessary to understand the peripheral mechanisms by which song is produced. This paper reviews recent advances in the understanding of syringeal and respiratory motor control and how birds utilize these systems to create their species‐typical sounds. Songbirds have a relatively homogeneous duplex vocal organ in which sound is generated by oscillation of a pair of thickened labia on either side of the… Expand
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