Processing of wild cereal grains in the Upper Palaeolithic revealed by starch grain analysis

@article{Piperno2004ProcessingOW,
  title={Processing of wild cereal grains in the Upper Palaeolithic revealed by starch grain analysis},
  author={Dolores R. Piperno and Ehud Weiss and Irene Holst and Dani Nadel},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={430},
  pages={670-673}
}
Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and wheat (Triticum monococcum L. and Triticum turgidum L.) were among the principal ‘founder crops’ of southwest Asian agriculture. Two issues that were central to the cultural transition from foraging to food production are poorly understood. They are the dates at which human groups began to routinely exploit wild varieties of wheat and barley, and when foragers first utilized technologies to pound and grind the hard, fibrous seeds of these and other plants to turn… Expand
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