Proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) social organization: Nature and possible functions of intergroup patterns of association

@article{Yeager1992ProboscisM,
  title={Proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) social organization: Nature and possible functions of intergroup patterns of association},
  author={Carey P. Yeager},
  journal={American Journal of Primatology},
  year={1992},
  volume={26}
}
  • C. Yeager
  • Published 1992
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American Journal of Primatology
Proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) socioecology was studied at the Natai Lengkuas Station, Tanjung Puting National Park, in Kalimantan Tengah, Indonesia. Data on the nature of intergroup interactions were collected on ten one‐male groups and two all‐male groups using event sampling during follows and also through evening census surveys. Proboscis monkeys form stable one‐male groups, with specific groups regularly associating at their sleeping sites (band members). Both intraband and interband… Expand
The ecology and behaviour of proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) in mangrove habitat of Labuk Bay, Sabah
TLDR
The results indicated that the activity patterns for semi-Wild proboscis monkeys are similar with those In the wild, and the significant positive correlations between monthly feeding frequencies to monthly pancakes and young leaves feeding frequencies suggest that pancakes and mangroves plants are equally important food sources for proboscIS monkeys in LBPMS. Expand
Vocal acoustics in the endangered proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus)
TLDR
Three of the call‐types identified can be considered as “loud calls” and are therefore deemed promising candidates for non‐invasive, vocalization‐based monitoring of proboscis monkeys for conservation purposes. Expand
Does intraspecific variation in social systems explain reported differences in the social structure of the proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus)?
TLDR
The social structure of proboscis monkeys in Brunei Bay area of Brunei Darussalam was investigated and it was found that the monkeys were organized into groups containing one male, several females, and offspring, thus forming a secondary level of organization. Expand
Social Behavior and Dominance of the Crowned Sifaka (Propithecus coronatus) in Northwestern Madagascar
TLDR
It is detected no significant change of sifaka behavior during interspecific encounters with rufous brown lemur or with mongoose lemur, suggesting these two species live in total sympatry with P. coronatus. Expand
Selection of river crossing location and sleeping site by proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) in Sabah, Malaysia
TLDR
The frequency of river crossings for focal monkeys in the BE‐Group was significantly higher at locations with narrow branch‐to‐bank distances, and sleeping sites locations that offer arboreal escape routes may protect proboscis monkeys from leopard attack. Expand
Female social dynamics in a provisioned free‐ranging band of the Sichuan snub‐nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in the Qinling mountains, China
TLDR
It is suggested that females place a high priority on maintaining long‐term relationships with other female in their one‐male units (OMUs) and that female social interactions appeared to resemble those of other female‐bonded primate societies. Expand
The nose is mightier than the tooth: larger male proboscis monkeys have smaller canines
TLDR
This unique case of decoupling of body and canine size reveals that large canines carry an ecological cost and raises interesting questions regarding the developmental mechanism that produces a negative correlation among adult body, nose size, and canine sizes. Expand
Affiliative interactions between one-male units in a band of Sichuan snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecusroxellana) living in the Qinling Mountains, China
TLDR
A band composed of OMUs and all male group(s) is the basic unit of social structure of this species of Rhinopithecus roxellana living in the Qinling Mountains, China for 3 years from 2002 to 2004. Expand
Nasalis larvatus (Primates: Colobini)
TLDR
Nasalis larvatus, proboscis monkey, is the only member of its genus and is the largest colobine monkey, which has a uniquely large nose in males. Expand
Status and Conservation of Proboscis Monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) in Sabah, East Malaysia
Abstract: The proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) was surveyed in the East Malaysian state of Sabah to establish its population status and to assess threats to its survival. It was found to be moreExpand
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 11 REFERENCES
Proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) social organization: Intergroup patterns of association
  • C. Yeager
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of primatology
  • 1991
TLDR
Proboscis monkey social organization was studied at the Natai Lengkuas station, Tanjung Puting National Park in Kalimantan Tengah, Indonesia and indicated that the groups formed two separate bands, the first evidence for such a two‐tiered system of organization in an arboreal colobine species. Expand
Proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) social organization: Group structure
  • C. Yeager
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of primatology
  • 1990
TLDR
Proboscis monkey social organization was studied at the Tanjung Puting National Park in Kalimantan Tengah, Indonesia and one‐male groups appear to be “female bonded”; adult females direct affiliative behaviors towards their offspring and other adult females, not towards the male. Expand
Notes on the sexual behavior of the proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus)
  • C. Yeager
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of primatology
  • 1990
TLDR
Proboscis monkey sexual behavior was studied at the Tanjung Puting National Park in Kalimantan Tengah, Indonesia, for 12 months using event sampling for copulations, presents, and same‐sex mounts. Expand
Possible antipredator behavior associated with river crossings by proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus)
TLDR
Proboscis monkeys' river crossing behavior was examined as a potential behavioral response to predation threat, and increased vigilance prior to crossing and leaping as far across the river as possible were observed. Expand
Socioecology of Five Sympatric Monkey Species in the Kibale Forest, Uganda
TLDR
The smallest monkeys had the largest group size and the smallest home range, probably due to their greater dietary diversity and foraging efficiency for mobile arthropods, and similar trends are suggested by the spider, capuchin, and squirrel monkeys. Expand
The social life of a black-and-white Colobus monkey, Colobus guereza.
  • J. Oates
  • Geography, Medicine
  • Zeitschrift fur Tierpsychologie
  • 1977
TLDR
To investigate relationships between ecology and social organization, observations were made on several populations of Colobus guereza in East Africa in 1970-74 and results are reported, emphasizing differences in male and female strategies. Expand
POPULATION SYNCHRONY IN MAYFLIES: A PREDATOR SATIATION HYPOTHESIS
TLDR
It is hypotheses that predator satiation provides a better conceptual framework for assessing adult emergence patterns in mayflies and perhaps other aquatic insects and that synchronization should be developed best in species having short-lived adults that are spatially dispersed. Expand
Handbook of ethological methods
TLDR
This book discusses a conceptual model of animal behavior and its application to statistical methods, as well as guidelines for the use of animals in research and the interpretation of results. Expand
Reverberations and Amplitude Fluctuations in the Propagation of Sound in a Forest: Implications for Animal Communication
TLDR
This study documents two primary sources of degradation of acoustic signals during propagation through natural environments, irregular amplitude fluctuations and reverberations, and finds intermediate frequencies (2-8 kHz) are most suitable for long-range acoustic communication. Expand
...
1
2
...