Problems in the resuscitation of mammals from body temperatures below 0°C

@article{Smith1957ProblemsIT,
  title={Problems in the resuscitation of mammals from body temperatures below 0°C},
  author={A. Smith},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B - Biological Sciences},
  year={1957},
  volume={147},
  pages={533 - 544}
}
  • A. Smith
  • Published 1957
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B - Biological Sciences
Two hundred and seventy-five years have passed since Robert Boyle discovered that extreme cold prevented the putrefaction of animal tissues. He found that frogs and fish actually survived for short periods when the water surrounding them had frozen, but succumbed after several days’ encasement in ice. Boyle described these as promiscuous experiments. He also reported two modes of death in humans exposed to intense cold. Usually the extremities were gradually invaded by numbness which spread… Expand
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  • A. Smith
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 1959
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There is no evidence that any human being whose internal temperature has reached freezing point has recovered, and the question is whether a high blood alcohol level favors survival from severe hypothermia, or whether the intoxicated merely are more liable to expose themselves. Expand
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  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 1959
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The aims of those experiments were to demonstrate that animals cannot recover from severe hypothermia after a period, even though they are breathing, and to distinguish effects of hibernation from those of artificial cooling in the same species. Expand
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  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • 1971
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  • Biology, Medicine
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  • 1971
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