Problem‐based learning versus lecture‐based learning in a course of basic pharmacology: a controlled, randomized study

@article{Antepohl1999ProblembasedLV,
  title={Problem‐based learning versus lecture‐based learning in a course of basic pharmacology: a controlled, randomized study},
  author={Wolfram Antepohl and Stefan Herzig},
  journal={Medical Education},
  year={1999},
  volume={33}
}
Since its first implementation in a medical programme at McMaster University, Canada, problem‐based learning (PBL) has become a well‐established means of teaching and learning medicine. Extensive research has been conducted and a number of strengths of the method are well supported. Several items, however, remain unclear1 although there is evidence that no relevant difference exists in factual knowledge among students from PBL and traditional curricula, a controlled, randomized study has not… 
Introduction of Problem Based Learning and Its Comparison with Conventional Lecture Based Learning in Pharmacology for Undergraduates
Presently medical students must memorise numerous detailed facts about drugs and pharmacologically active substances without a direct clinical context. There is a need to encourage application of the
Problem-based learning and teaching of medical pharmacology
  • C. Kwan
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology
  • 2002
TLDR
In this case, the PBL approach is adopted to complement the conventional lectures at the course level, rather than being recreated from discrete disciplinary areas (such as physiology, anatomy, biochemistry, pharmacology, and community medicine).
Impact of a problem-based learning elective on performance in non-problem-based learning required courses.
TLDR
This study demonstrated an overall benefit for students who participated in a PBL course on performance in simultaneous, critical thinking courses that did not incorporate PBL in subsequent critical thinking, non-PBL courses.
Comparing the long-term retention of a physiology course for medical students with the traditional and problem-based learning
TLDR
Considering the positive effect of study skills on long-term student scores, it is recommended students to receive instructions regarding the appropriate study skills when initiated into universities.
Problem-Based Learning
Problem-based learning (PBL) is perhaps the most innovative instructional method conceived in the history of education. PBL was originally designed to respond to the criticism that traditional
Comparison of problem-and lecture-based pharmacology teaching.
TLDR
Comparisons of PBL methods with conventional lecture-based learning methods within general pharmacology courses for medical students show that PBL students are at least as successful in standardized tests but enjoy their course to a greater extent than do LBL students.
Problem- vs. lecture-based pharmacology teaching in a German medical school
TLDR
It is concluded that a switch from LBL to PBL teaching of pharmacology does not occur at the expense of factual knowledge transmission and nation-wide pharmacology exams.
Need for Problem-Based Learning in Clinical Pharmacy Education in India
TLDR
The PBL can be incorporated in the future clinical pharmacy practice curriculum to make PharmD course an effective in training skilled clinical pharmacist.
Problem-based learning in academic health education. A systematic literature review.
  • I. Polyzois, N. Claffey, N. Mattheos
  • Psychology, Medicine
    European journal of dental education : official journal of the Association for Dental Education in Europe
  • 2010
TLDR
At the level of RCTs and comparative studies (whole curricula), no clear difference was observed between PBL and conventional teaching and it was only comparative studies of single PBL intervention in a traditional curriculum that yielded results that were consistently in favour of PBL.
Preliminary investigation into application of problem-based learning in the practical teaching of diagnostics
TLDR
The questionnaire survey revealed that PBL could improve interest in learning, cultivate an ability to study independently, improve communication and analytical skills, and good team cooperation spirit, however, there were some shortcomings in systematization of imparting knowledge.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 21 REFERENCES
Problem‐based Learning: A Review of Literature on Its Outcomes and Implementation Issues
TLDR
It is recommended that caution be exercised in making comprehensive, curriculum‐wide conversions to PBL until more is learned about (1) the extent to which faculty should direct students throughout medical training, (2) PBL methods that are less costly, (3) cognitive‐processing weaknesses shown by PBL students, and (4) the apparent high resource utilization by P BL graduates.
The effect of compulsory participation of medical students in problem‐based learning
TLDR
This study compared a group of students who had chosen to be in a PBL curriculum with a group who had not, as they undertook a curriculum that contained both PBL and lecture‐based courses.
Problem-based learning in medical education: Developing a research agenda
  • C. Woodward
  • Medicine
    Advances in health sciences education : theory and practice
  • 1996
TLDR
This analysis summarizes the research evidence regarding PBL by examining how well it has met its originators' goals, what the authors know about how PBL works, and how it fares in a goal-free comparison with conventional curricula.
Does problem‐based learning work? A meta‐analysis of evaluative research
  • D. T. Vernon, R. Blake
  • Medicine
    Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
  • 1993
TLDR
The results generally support the superiority of the PBL approach over more traditional methods in problem-based learning.
Effect of problem-based, self-directed undergraduate education on life-long learning.
TLDR
The graduates of a problem-based, self-directed undergraduate curriculum who go on to primary care careers are more up to date in knowledge of the management of hypertension than graduates of an traditional curriculum.
Comparative study of medical education as perceived by students at three Dutch universities
TLDR
The results suggest that in their own opinion students and graduates from the three schools do not differ in clinical patient management skills acquired in medical school, and are considered indicative of the effects resulting from the different curricula.
Performances on the NBME I, II, and III by medical students in the problem‐based learning and conventional tracks at the University of New Mexico
TLDR
For both tracks, MCAT scores, especially in the lowest and highest ranges, were most predictive of performances on the NBME I and II, while in the long run, the more student-centered problem-based curriculum better prepared the students for theNBME III.
Problem‐based learning: rationale and description
TLDR
The process of problem‐based learning is described and measured against three principles of learning: activation of prior knowledge, elaboration and encoding specificity.
On the Role of Biomedical Knowledge in Clinical Reasoning by Experts, Intermediates and Novices
TLDR
It was shown that experts have more in-depth biomedical knowledge than novices and subjects at intermediate levels of expertise and generally support a three-stage model of expertise development in medicine consisting of acquisition of biomedical knowledge, practical experience, and integration of theoretical and experientall knowledge resulting in knowledge encapsulation.
Problem‐based learning: cognitive retention and cohort traits of randomly selected participants and decliners
No abstract available.
...
1
2
3
...