Probing Upflowing Regions in the Quiet Sun and Coronal Holes

@article{Schwanitz2021ProbingUR,
  title={Probing Upflowing Regions in the Quiet Sun and Coronal Holes},
  author={Conrad Schwanitz and Louise K. Harra and Noureddine Raouafi and Alphonse C. Sterling and Alejandro Moreno Vacas and Jos{\'e} Carlos del Toro Iniesta and D. Orozco Su{\'a}rez and Hirohisa Hara},
  journal={Solar Physics},
  year={2021},
  volume={296}
}
Recent observations from Parker Solar Probe have revealed that the solar wind has a highly variable structure. How this complex behaviour is formed in the solar corona is not yet known, since it requires omnipresent fluctuations, which constantly emit material to feed the wind. In this article we analyse 14 upflow regions in the solar corona to find potential sources for plasma flow. The upflow regions are derived from spectroscopic data from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode… 

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