Probability Neglect: Emotions, Worst Cases, and Law

@article{Sunstein2001ProbabilityNE,
  title={Probability Neglect: Emotions, Worst Cases, and Law},
  author={Cass R. Sunstein},
  journal={Law \& Economics},
  year={2001}
}
When strong emotions are triggered by a risk, people show a remarkable tendency to neglect a small probability that the risk will actually come to fruition. Experimental evidence, involving electric shocks and arsenic, supports this claim, as does real-world evidence, involving responses to abandoned hazardous waste dumps, the pesticide Alar, and anthrax. The resulting "probability neglect" has many implications for law and policy. It suggests the need for institutional constraints on policies… Expand
Probability Neglect: Emotions, Worst Cases, and Law
When strong emotions are triggered by a risk, people show a remarkable tendency to neglect a small probability that the risk will actually come to fruition. Experimental evidence, involving electricExpand
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