Probabilistic behaviour in ants: A strategy of errors?

@article{Deneubourg1983ProbabilisticBI,
  title={Probabilistic behaviour in ants: A strategy of errors?},
  author={Jean-Louis Deneubourg and Jacques M. Pasteels and J. -C. Verhaeghe},
  journal={Journal of Theoretical Biology},
  year={1983},
  volume={105},
  pages={259-271}
}
Animal behaviour is probabilistic. This is exemplified by the communication behaviour of ants during food-searching. Experimental evidence demonstrates that species differ in the accuracy of their recruitment. We show here, with the help of a very simple mathematical model, that the randomness of behaviour can have an adaptative advantage for ants. The model demonstrates that the degree of randomness could be optimally “tuned” to particular ecological conditions, such as food quantity and… 

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