Privacy Issues in Internet Surveys

@article{Cho1999PrivacyII,
  title={Privacy Issues in Internet Surveys},
  author={Hyunyi Cho and R. LaRose},
  journal={Social Science Computer Review},
  year={1999},
  volume={17},
  pages={421 - 434}
}
Surveys administered over the Internet have been plagued by low response rates and at times have provoked respondent rebellions against researchers who stand accused of broadcasting noxious unwanted e-mail or “spam.” This article examines the issue from the perspective of social science research on privacy in an effort to understand the unique privacy context of Internet-based survey research. Online surveyors commit multiple violations of physical, informational, and psychological privacy that… Expand

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