• Corpus ID: 89546405

Priscalestidae, a new damselfly family (Odonata: Lestinoidea) from the Middle Eocene Eckfeld maar of Germany

@inproceedings{Wappler2007PriscalestidaeAN,
  title={Priscalestidae, a new damselfly family (Odonata: Lestinoidea) from the Middle Eocene Eckfeld maar of Germany},
  author={Torsten Wappler and Juli{\'a}n F. Petrulevi{\vc}ius and Paseo del Bosque},
  year={2007}
}
ABSTRACTWe describe Priscalestes germanica Petrulevicius & Wappler, a new genus and species of Lestinoidea Calvert (1901) (sensu Bechly 1996) from the Eocene of Germany. The new genus represents a new family, Priscalestidae Petrulevicius & Wappler fam. nov., with close relationship to Megalestidae, Lestidae and the genus Promegalestes Petrulevicius & Nel 2004 from the late Paleocene of Argentina.. The new family seems to be in a basal position with respect to the Lestidae because of the lack of… 
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