Prioritizing Systemic Corticosteroid Treatments to Mitigate Relapse in Adults With Acute Asthma: A Systematic Review and Network Meta‐analysis

@article{Rowe2017PrioritizingSC,
  title={Prioritizing Systemic Corticosteroid Treatments to Mitigate Relapse in Adults With Acute Asthma: A Systematic Review and Network Meta‐analysis},
  author={Brian H. Rowe and Scott W. Kirkland and B. Vandermeer and Sandy Campbell and Amanda S. Newton and Francine Monique Ducharme and Cristina Villa‐Roel},
  journal={Academic Emergency Medicine},
  year={2017},
  volume={24},
  pages={371–381}
}
OBJECTIVES While systemic corticosteroids (SCS) are widely used to prevent relapse in adults with acute asthma discharged from the emergency department, the most effective route of administration is unclear. The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of SCS in adults and to identify the most effective route of SCS to preventing relapse. METHODS A search was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of intramuscular (IM) or oral (PO… 

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