Prior Exposure Increases Perceived Accuracy of Fake News

@article{Pennycook2018PriorEI,
  title={Prior Exposure Increases Perceived Accuracy of Fake News},
  author={Gordon Pennycook and Tyrone D. Cannon and David G. Rand},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Psychology: General},
  year={2018},
  volume={147},
  pages={1865–1880}
}
The 2016 U.S. presidential election brought considerable attention to the phenomenon of “fake news”: entirely fabricated and often partisan content that is presented as factual. Here we demonstrate one mechanism that contributes to the believability of fake news: fluency via prior exposure. Using actual fake-news headlines presented as they were seen on Facebook, we show that even a single exposure increases subsequent perceptions of accuracy, both within the same session and after a week… 

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