Printing and Protestants: An Empirical Test of the Role of Printing in the Reformation

@article{Rubin2014PrintingAP,
  title={Printing and Protestants: An Empirical Test of the Role of Printing in the Reformation},
  author={Jared Rubin},
  journal={Review of Economics and Statistics},
  year={2014},
  volume={96},
  pages={270-286}
}
  • Jared Rubin
  • Published 1 May 2014
  • Economics
  • Review of Economics and Statistics
Abstract The causes of the Protestant Reformation have long been debated. This paper seeks to revive and econometrically test the theory that the spread of the Reformation is linked to the spread of the printing press. I test this theory by analyzing data on the spread of the press and the Reformation at the city level. An econometric analysis that instruments for omitted variable bias with a city's distance from Mainz, the birthplace of printing, suggests that cities with at least one printing… 
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