Principles of macromolecular organization and cell function in bacteria and archaea

@article{Hoppert2007PrinciplesOM,
  title={Principles of macromolecular organization and cell function in bacteria and archaea},
  author={M. Hoppert and F. Mayer},
  journal={Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics},
  year={2007},
  volume={31},
  pages={247-284}
}
Structural organization of the cytoplasm by compartmentation is a well established fact for the eukaryotic cell. In prokaryotes, compartmentation is less obvious. Most prokaryotes do not need intracytoplasmic membranes to maintain their vital functions. This review, especially dealing with prokaryotes, will point out that compartmentation in prokaryotes is present, but not only achieved by membranes. Besides membranes, the nucleoid, multienzyme complexes and metabolons, storage granules, and… Expand
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