Principles of Psychology

@article{DeesePrinciplesOP,
  title={Principles of Psychology},
  author={J. Deese},
  journal={Nature},
  volume={112},
  pages={761-761}
}
COL. LYNCH'S complaint of ill-usage to his book in the review in NATURE amounts to a charge that the reviewer has failed to appreciate the originality and the scientific importance of the author's system of psychology. This charge is true. All I can do is to assure your readers that I wrote without consciousness of prejudice, and only after a thoughtful reading of the book and sincere attempt to discover the author's meaning. I respect the author and had no intention of giving offence. 
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We were driving back from ---- in a wagonette. The door flew open and X., alias 'Baldy
  • fell out on the road. We pulled up at once, and then he said, 'Did anybody fall out?' or 'Who fell out?' - I don't exactly remember the words. When told that Baldy fell out, he said, 'Did Baldy fall out? Poor Baldy!'"
resting
  • reading, and 'looking round.' I have unfortunately been unable to get independent corroboration of these details, as the hotel registers are destroyed, and the boarding−house named by him has been pulled down. He forgets the name of the two ladies who kept it.
Is there a Special Activity of Attention?" in 'Mind
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is only a protracted patience (une longue patience).' 'In the exact sciences, at least
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