Primum Non Nocere: Obesity Stigma and Public Health

@article{Vartanian2013PrimumNN,
  title={Primum Non Nocere: Obesity Stigma and Public Health},
  author={Lenny R. Vartanian and Joshua M. Smyth},
  journal={Journal of Bioethical Inquiry},
  year={2013},
  volume={10},
  pages={49-57}
}
Several recent anti-obesity campaigns appear to embrace stigmatization of obese individuals as a public health strategy. These approaches seem to be based on the fundamental assumptions that (1) obesity is largely under an individual’s control and (2) stigmatizing obese individuals will motivate them to change their behavior and will also result in successful behavior change. The empirical evidence does not support these assumptions: Although body weight is, to some degree, under individuals… Expand
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If additional studies replicate the basic pattern of results observed in Major et al., then they would be in a stronger position to argue against the stigmatization of overweight and obese individuals not only because it is morally questionable and damaging to well-being, but also because it could actually propagate ‘unhealthy eating habits’ and be detrimental to public health. Expand
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