Primitive soft-bodied cephalopods from the Cambrian

@article{Smith2010PrimitiveSC,
  title={Primitive soft-bodied cephalopods from the Cambrian},
  author={Martin R. Smith and Jean‐Bernard Caron},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2010},
  volume={465},
  pages={469-472}
}
The exquisite preservation of soft-bodied animals in Burgess Shale-type deposits provides important clues into the early evolution of body plans that emerged during the Cambrian explosion. Until now, such deposits have remained silent regarding the early evolution of extant molluscan lineages—in particular the cephalopods. Nautiloids, traditionally considered basal within the cephalopods, are generally depicted as evolving from a creeping Cambrian ancestor whose dorsal shell afforded protection… Expand
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