Priming involuntary autobiographical memories

@article{Mace2005PrimingIA,
  title={Priming involuntary autobiographical memories},
  author={John H. Mace},
  journal={Memory},
  year={2005},
  volume={13},
  pages={874 - 884}
}
Involuntary autobiographical memories occur frequently in daily life and are usually triggered by cues in one's environment. This study investigated the possibility that priming plays a role in the production of involuntary memories. In Study 1, participants recorded their involuntary memories in a diary for 14 days and then completed a questionnaire assessing their cognitive activity during the recording period. Participants indicating frequent thought about significant others on the… Expand
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A modified experimental paradigm was used, originally used by Schlagman and Kvavilashvili (2008), to study IAMs under well-controlled laboratory conditions and suggested that priming may play a significant role in the activation and recall of IAMS. Expand
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A structured diary procedure was used to compare different types of voluntary autobiographical memories to their involuntary counterparts, and the results replicated previous findings with regard to differences between word-prompted voluntary and involuntary memories. Expand
Involuntary autobiographical memories and their relation to other forms of spontaneous thoughts
  • D. Berntsen
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B
  • 2020
TLDR
Findings suggest that intrusive involuntary memories observed clinically after traumatic events should be viewed as a dysfunctional subclass of otherwise functional involuntary autobiographical memories, a distinct category of spontaneous thought that cannot be equated with mind wandering. Expand
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TLDR
Involuntary memories were more specific and were retrieved significantly faster than voluntary memories and were more likely to be triggered by negative cues, whereas cue valence did not have any effect on the number of voluntary memories. Expand
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The results showed that, despite controlled conditions, considerable individual differences were observed in the number of involuntary autobiographical memories reported while walking along a prescribed route on the campus, and that reported memories were predominantly serving self function. Expand
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Individual differences in recognising involuntary autobiographical memories: Impact on the reporting of abstract cues
TLDR
Individual differences in the ability to recognise involuntary autobiographical memories are examined, showing undergraduate participants and non-psychology graduate participants reporting fewer involuntary memories being triggered by abstract cues than the graduate psychology participants, while the groups did not differ in the report of memories triggered by sensory/perpetual cues. Expand
Current concerns in involuntary and voluntary autobiographical memories
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Memory related to current concerns were rated as more central to the person's identity, life story and expectations for the future than non-concerned memories, irrespective of mode of recall. Expand
Episodic remembering creates access to involuntary conscious memory: Demonstrating involuntary recall on a voluntary recall task
TLDR
The results showed that involuntary memories did occur when participants were recalling the past, and chaining should also occur on autobiographical memory tasks, and showed involuntary memories dissociating from voluntary memories on two independent measures, enhancing the credibility of the results. Expand
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