Primate brain evolution : genetic and functional considerations

@article{Keverne1996PrimateBE,
  title={Primate brain evolution : genetic and functional considerations},
  author={ERIC B. Keverne and Frances L. Martel and Claire M. Nevison},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1996},
  volume={263},
  pages={689 - 696}
}
Functionally distinct regions of the brain to which maternal and paternal genomes contribute differentially (through genomic imprinting) have developed differentially over phylogenetic time. While certain regions of the primate forebrain (neocortex, striatum) have expanded relative to the rest of the brain, other forebrain regions have contracted in size (hypothalamus, septum). Areas of relative expansion are those to which the maternal genome makes a substantial developmental contribution… Expand
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