Primary Progressive Aphasia in a Bilingual Woman

@article{Filley2006PrimaryPA,
  title={Primary Progressive Aphasia in a Bilingual Woman},
  author={Christopher M. Filley and Gail Ramsberger and Lise Menn and Jiang Wu and Bessie Y Reid and Allan L Reid},
  journal={Neurocase},
  year={2006},
  volume={12},
  pages={296 - 299}
}
Multilingual aphasias are common because most people in the world know more than one language, but little is known of these syndromes except in patients who have had a stroke. We present a 76-year-old right-handed woman, fluent in English and Chinese, who developed anomia at age 70 and then progressed to aphasia. Functional neuroimaging disclosed mild left temporoparietal hypometabolism. Neurolinguistic testing was performed in both English and Chinese, representing a unique contribution to the… Expand
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