Prey specialization may influence patterns of gene flow in wolves of the Canadian Northwest

@article{Carmichael2001PreySM,
  title={Prey specialization may influence patterns of gene flow in wolves of the Canadian Northwest},
  author={Lindsey E. Carmichael and John A. Nagy and Nicholas C. Larter and Curtis Strobeck},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2001},
  volume={10}
}
This study characterizes population genetic structure among grey wolves (Canis lupus) in northwestern Canada, and discusses potential physical and biological determinants of this structure. Four hundred and ninety‐one grey wolves, from nine regions in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and British Columbia, were genotyped using nine microsatellite loci. Results indicate that wolf gene flow is reduced significantly across the Mackenzie River, most likely due to the north–south migration patterns… 
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