Prey detection by bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus: an experimental test of the passive listening hypothesis

@article{Gannon2005PreyDB,
  title={Prey detection by bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus: an experimental test of the passive listening hypothesis},
  author={D. Gannon and N. Barros and D. Nowacek and A. Read and R. Wells},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2005},
  volume={69},
  pages={709-720}
}
  • D. Gannon, N. Barros, +2 authors R. Wells
  • Published 2005
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
  • Bottlenose dolphins possess a sophisticated echolocation system, but evidence suggests that they use this sensory modality sparingly in the wild. Several authors have noted that soniferous fish are prevalent in the diet of bottlenose dolphins, leading to the hypothesis that these predators detect their prey by passive listening. We tested this hypothesis by performing controlled acoustic playback experiments with free-ranging dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida. We used recorded calls of prey… CONTINUE READING
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