Prevalence of prostate cancer among men with a prostate-specific antigen level < or =4.0 ng per milliliter.

@article{Thompson2004PrevalenceOP,
  title={Prevalence of prostate cancer among men with a prostate-specific antigen level < or =4.0 ng per milliliter.},
  author={Ian M. Thompson and Donna K. Pauler and Phyllis J. Goodman and Catherine M. Tangen and M. Scott Lucia and Howard L. Parnes and Lori M. Minasian and Leslie G. Ford and Scott M. Lippman and E. David Crawford and John J. Crowley and Charles Arthur Coltman},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={350 22},
  pages={
          2239-46
        }
}
BACKGROUND The optimal upper limit of the normal range for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is unknown. We investigated the prevalence of prostate cancer among men in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial who had a PSA level of 4.0 ng per milliliter or less. METHODS Of 18,882 men enrolled in the prevention trial, 9459 were randomly assigned to receive placebo and had an annual measurement of PSA and a digital rectal examination. Among these 9459 men, 2950 men never had a PSA level of more than… Expand

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