Prevalence of polycystic ovaries in women with androgenic alopecia.

@article{Cela2003PrevalenceOP,
  title={Prevalence of polycystic ovaries in women with androgenic alopecia.},
  author={Ester Marina Cela and Carole Robertson and Karen Rush and Eleni Kousta and Davinia M White and Helen Wilson and Glenn Lyons and P. Kingsley and Mark I. McCarthy and Stephen Franks},
  journal={European journal of endocrinology},
  year={2003},
  volume={149 5},
  pages={
          439-42
        }
}
OBJECTIVE Although androgenic alopecia is recognised to be a symptom of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), it is not known whether polycystic ovaries (PCO) and associated endocrine abnormalities are present in patients who present with alopecia as a primary complaint. We therefore set out to determine the strength of the association between androgenic alopecia and PCO. We examined the prevalence of ultrasound-based polycystic ovarian morphology and associated clinical and biochemical features in… 
Cutaneous manifestation of polycystic ovary syndrome
TLDR
All cutaneous manifestations of PCOS, except for acne, were associated with higher body mass index (BMI), and Elevated LH:FSH ratio of more than 2:1 was the most common hormonal abnormality, followed by increased LH and total testosterone.
Prevalence of androgenic alopecia in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and characterization of associated clinical and biochemical features.
TLDR
AGA is prevalent in 22% of subjects meeting diagnostic criteria for PCOS and is associated with other manifestations of clinical hyper androgenism, but not with greater risk of biochemical hyperandrogenemia or metabolic dysfunction than with PCOS alone.
Dermatologic Manifestations of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
TLDR
Women with PCOS may present with a range of signs and symptoms, and face increased risks of reproductive, metabolic, cardiovascular, psychologic, and neoplastic sequelae, particularly if the condition is left unrecognized or untreated.
Definitions, prevalence and symptoms of polycystic ovaries and polycystic ovary syndrome.
TLDR
A new consensus is achieved regarding the definition of PCOS, which is now defined as the presence of any two of the following three criteria: polycystic ovaries, oligo-/anovulation, or clinical or biochemical evidence of hyperandrogenism.
ANDROGENIC ALOPECIA AND INSULIN RESISTANCE . MALE EQUIVALENT OF POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME ?
The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in female population belongs to the widest spread endocrine disorders with prevalence between 5-10 % (ASUNCION et al. 2000). PCOS is now recognised as an
“Secondary” Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
TLDR
This chapter considers disorders that can present as PCOS, discuss their pathogenesis and diagnosis and define the features that may help distinguish them from PCOS.
Diagnostic criteria for polycystic ovary syndrome: pitfalls and controversies.
  • M. Lujan, D. Chizen, R. Pierson
  • Medicine
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada : JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada : JOGC
  • 2008
TLDR
Clinical signs of hyperandrogenism are ill-defined in women with PCOS, and the diagnosis of both hirsutism and polycystic ovarian morphology remains alarmingly subjective, so there is an inappropriate tendency to assign ovulatory status solely on the basis of menstrual cycle history or poorly timed endocrine measurements.
Specific dermatologic features of the polycystic ovary syndrome and its association with biochemical markers of the metabolic syndrome and hyperandrogenism
TLDR
Hirsutism appears to be strongly related with hyperandrogenism and metabolic abnormalities in PCOS women, and acne and androgenic alopecia are not good markers for the hyper androgenism inPCOS.
Hirsutism, Acne, and Hair Loss: Management of Hyperandrogenic Cutaneous Manifestations of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
TLDR
Treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome includes a combination of combined oral contraceptives, antiandrogens, insulin sensitizers, gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists, topical medications, and cosmetic procedures.
Diagnosing polycystic ovary syndrome
TLDR
The diagnosis of PCOS is made primarily on clinical and ultrasonographic criteria and a discussion follows on useful hormonal investigations, careful history and appropriate initial investigations which will usually help distinguish PCOS from other causes of androgen excess and menstrual disturbance.
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