Prevalence of objective eye manifestations in people working in office buildings with different prevalences of the sick building syndrome compared with the general population

@article{Franck1993PrevalenceOO,
  title={Prevalence of objective eye manifestations in people working in office buildings with different prevalences of the sick building syndrome compared with the general population},
  author={Carsten Franck and Elsa Bach and Peder G Skov},
  journal={International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health},
  year={1993},
  volume={65},
  pages={65-69}
}
SummaryA cross-sectional clinical epidemiological study was carried out among 169 office workers in four Copenhagen town halls with different prevalences of the sick building syndrome. The results were compared with those in 112 subjects randomly selected from the general population. Biomicroscopic eye manifestations, such as premature break-up of the precorneal tear film, absence of foam at the inner eye canthus and epithelial damage of the bulbar conjunctiva, were investigated together with… 
Eye- and skin symptoms in German office workers--subjective perception vs. objective medical screening.
TLDR
Non-parametric analysis revealed a significant association between medical tests of symptoms and self-reported complaints regarding skin/eyes and low sebaceous secretion and/or low stratum corneum hydration was associated significantly with increased skin complaints.
Self-reported eye symptoms and related diagnostic findings--comparison of risk factor profiles.
TLDR
There is a need for the development and application of objective clinical methods for field monitoring in parallel with questioning of self-reported eye symptoms in conjunction with indoor environmental problems to be validated by objective medical examinations.
External eye symptoms in indoor environments
TLDR
To be in a position to interpret the high prevalence of eye symptoms, a multidisciplinary and integrated approach is necessary that involves the external eye physiology, eye diseases, and risk factors that aggravate the stability of precorneal tear film (PTF) resulting in hyperosmolarity and initiation of inflammatory reactions.
No consistent risk factor pattern for symptoms related to the sick building syndrome: a prospective population based study
TLDR
This study gives only limited support to the hypothesis of causal relationships between the indoor environment and these symptoms, and found no evidence of persistent mucous membrane symptoms and general symptoms related to specific factors in the indoor environments.
Molds in floor dust and building-related symptoms in adolescent school children.
TLDR
Five of eight building-related symptoms were significantly and positively associated with the concentration of colony forming units of molds in floor dust: eye irritation, throat irritation, headache, concentration problems, and dizziness, and in none of the analyses was mold exposure the strongest covariate, being secondary to either asthma, hay fever, recent airway infection, or psychosocial factors.
The emergence and preservation of sick building syndrome : research challenges of a modern age disease
TLDR
It was suggested that evolving sick building syndromes should be approached and analysed using integrated bio-psycho-social models and qualitative methods were concluded that qualitative methods are well suited in the study of environmentally related, non-specific syndrome such as SBS.
Effect of Traffic Exposure on Sick Building Syndrome Symptoms among Parents/Grandparents of Preschool Children in Beijing, China
TLDR
This study found traffic exposure to be significantly associated with SBS symptoms, consistent with current literature that indicates an association between adverse health effects and living near highway or main road.
Molds in floor dust, building-related symptoms, and lung function among male and female schoolteachers.
TLDR
Women's reports of symptoms from mucous membranes and skin and general symptoms were positively associated with mold exposure and headache and difficulties to concentrate associated with indoor mold exposure, mainly for women.
Health symptoms and the work environment in four nonproblem United States office buildings.
TLDR
In response to symptoms ascribed to air quality problems, it may be appropriate to address employee perceptions regarding the work environment in addition to evaluating environmental characteristics relating to chemicals, biological contamination, air movement, temperature, and humidity.
Molds in floor dust and building-related symptoms among adolescent school children: a problem for boys only?
TLDR
The higher endogenous estrogen levels of sexually matured adolescent females seems to protect them from the effects of molds in dust, despite their overall higher symptom prevalence, according to a new hypothesis.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 16 REFERENCES
Evaluation of Two Different Questionnaires used for Diagnosing Ocular Manifestations in the Sick Building Syndrome on the Basis of an Objective Index
TLDR
The study shows that data from two different questionnaires on self-reported ocular manifestations associated with the Sick Building Syndrome are reproducible and associated with objective dryness in the eyes.
Eye symptoms and signs in buildings with indoor climate problems (‘office eye syndrome’)
TLDR
The investigation proved that eye irritation associated with indoor climate problems can be related to objective pathological changes in the eyes as found in the dry eyes.
The sick building syndrome: prevalence studies.
TLDR
Comparison of prevalences of symptoms between the naturally ventilated and the other buildings showed a repeated pattern of nasal, eye, and mucous membrane symptoms with lethargy, dry skin, and headaches that are suggested to represent the sick building syndrome.
Foam at inner eye canthus in office workers, compared with an average Danish population as control group
TLDR
It is concluded that the decreased foam formation in the office worker constitutes a key symptom in the development of ‘office eye syndrome’.
Environmental, occupational, and personal factors related to the prevalence of sick building syndrome in the general population.
TLDR
It was concluded that symptoms included in SBS are common in the general population, and of multifactorial origin related to both personal, occupational, and residential factors, and certain environmental exposures such as maternal smoking, the urban environment, VDU work, and volatile organic hydrocarbons from newly painted dwellings.
Influence of indoor climate on the sick building syndrome in an office environment. The Danish Indoor Climate Study Group.
TLDR
Investigation in Greater Copenhagen, Denmark found that the concentration of macromolecular organic floor dust, the floor covering, the number of workplaces in the office, the age of the building, the type of ventilation, and two easily recognizable factors, the shelf factor and the fleece factor, were associated with the prevalence of symptoms of the sick building syndrome.
Consistent pattern of elevated symptoms in air-conditioned office buildings: a reanalysis of epidemiologic studies.
TLDR
Air-conditioned buildings were consistently associated with increased prevalence of work-related headache, lethargy, and upper respiratory/mucus membrane symptoms and mechanical ventilation without air-conditioning was not associated with higher symptom prevalence.
Volatile organic compounds, respirable dust, and personal factors related to prevalence and incidence of sick building syndrome in primary schools.
TLDR
It is concluded that SBS is of multifactorial origin, related to a variety of factors and exposures, and the total concentration of hydrocarbons is a simple and convenient measure of exposure, which also seems to be a predictor of chronic symptoms.
...
1
2
...