Prevalence of mental health problems, treatment need, and barriers to care among primary care-seeking spouses of military service members involved in Iraq and Afghanistan deployments.

@article{Eaton2008PrevalenceOM,
  title={Prevalence of mental health problems, treatment need, and barriers to care among primary care-seeking spouses of military service members involved in Iraq and Afghanistan deployments.},
  author={Karen M. Eaton and Charles William Hoge and Stephen Craig Messer and Allison A. Whitt and Oscar A. Cabrera and Dennis McGurk and Anthony L. Cox and Carl Andrew Castro},
  journal={Military medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={173 11},
  pages={
          1051-6
        }
}
Military spouses must contend with unique issues such as a mobile lifestyle, rules and regulations of military life, and frequent family separations including peacekeeping and combat deployments. These issues may have an adverse effect on the health of military spouses. This study examined the mental health status, rates of care utilization, source of care, as well as barriers and stigma of mental health care utilization among military spouses who were seeking care in military primary care… 
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