Prevalence of feline leukaemia provirus DNA in feline lymphomas

@article{Weiss2010PrevalenceOF,
  title={Prevalence of feline leukaemia provirus DNA in feline lymphomas},
  author={Alexander Th. A. Weiss and Robert Klopfleisch and Achim D. Gruber},
  journal={Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery},
  year={2010},
  volume={12},
  pages={929 - 935}
}
A significant drop in the prevalence of feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) antigenaemic cats and antigen-associated lymphomas has been observed after the introduction of FeLV vaccination and antigen-testing with removal of persistently antigenaemic cats. However, recent reports have indicated that regressively infected cats may contain FeLV provirus DNA and that lymphoma development may be associated with the presence of provirus alone. In the present study, we investigated the presence of FeLV… 
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An error is identified in the listing of primers by Weiss et al1 while attempting to utilize the method for detection of FeLV proviral DNA by semi-nested PCR, and the primers do not perform as intended.
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TLDR
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