Prevalence of domestic violence when midwives routinely enquire in pregnancy

@article{Bacchus2004PrevalenceOD,
  title={Prevalence of domestic violence when midwives routinely enquire in pregnancy},
  author={Loraine J Bacchus and Gillian Mezey and Susan Bewley and Alison Haworth},
  journal={BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics \& Gynaecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={111}
}
Objective  To assess the prevalence of domestic violence in pregnancy when midwives are trained to enquire about it routinely. 
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