Prevalence, incidence, and progression of myopia of school children in Hong Kong.

@article{Fan2004PrevalenceIA,
  title={Prevalence, incidence, and progression of myopia of school children in Hong Kong.},
  author={Dorothy Shu-Ping Fan and Dennis S. C. Lam and Robert Fung Lam and Joseph Tak-fai Lau and King S Chong and Eva Y Y Cheung and Ricky Yiu Kwong Lai and Sek Jin Chew},
  journal={Investigative ophthalmology \& visual science},
  year={2004},
  volume={45 4},
  pages={
          1071-5
        }
}
  • D. Fan, D. Lam, S. Chew
  • Published 1 April 2004
  • Medicine
  • Investigative ophthalmology & visual science
PURPOSE To determine the prevalence, incidence, and progression of myopia of Chinese children in Hong Kong. METHODS A cross-sectional survey was initially conducted. A longitudinal follow-up study was then conducted 12 months later. RESULTS A total of 7560 children of mean age 9.33 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.11-9.45; range, 5-16) participated in the study. Mean spherical equivalent refraction (SER) was -0.33 D (SD = 11.56; range, -13.13 to +14.25 D). Myopia (SER <or= -0.50 D) was the… 

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