Presidents, Senates, and Failed Supreme Court Nominations

@article{Whittington2006PresidentsSA,
  title={Presidents, Senates, and Failed Supreme Court Nominations},
  author={Keith E. Whittington},
  journal={The Supreme Court Review},
  year={2006},
  volume={2006},
  pages={401 - 438}
}
With three controversial nominations to the Supreme Court just behind us, and the prospect of more in the near future, this is an opportune time to place the politics of Supreme Court appointments in broader perspective. Ultimately, what presidents care about is getting their nominees on the Court, and therefore this article manuscript focuses on those cases in which the Senate rejected the Supreme Court nomination of the president. The article examines what has accounted for these failed… 

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